Skip to main content
Welcome to BME

The Nancy E. and Peter C. Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering at Cornell University is building research and educational programs around a vision that a quantitative understanding of the human body can be used as a foundation for the rational design of therapies, molecules, devices, and diagnostic procedures to improve human health.

About BME

The primary mission of the Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering is to educate students to understand the human body as an integrated system and the mechanisms of disease through quantitative engineering analysis, and to use that understanding to design better therapeutic strategies, devices, and diagnostics to improve human health.

Academic Programs

Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering
The mission of the B.S. program in biomedical engineering (BME) is to train students in the practice of design, fabrication, and analysis of biomedical systems, devices, diagnostics, and therapeutics.  Specifically, Cornell's vision of biomedical engineering centers around a quantitative approach to understanding biology across length and time scales, with a focus on issues related to human health.

Masters of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering at Cornell University focuses on interdisciplinary research to achieve a quantitative understanding of human biology at all spatial and temporal scales with the goal of improving human health.

Masters of Engineering in Biomedical Engineering
Engineers who understand biology and who can apply their knowledge and skills to improve human health are increasingly in demand. A professional degree in biomedical engineering will prepare students to fill this increasingly critical need.

Recent News

Madhur Srivastava selected to attend CGI-U 2017 meeting

Ph.D. student to represent Cornell as a leading student innovator and entrepreneur at...

ComSciCon-Cornell aims to reach all communities

For the third year, Cornell is holding ComSciCon-Cornell, a science communication workshop...

Lammerding lab featured in The Scientist

Group's microchannel device highlighted as new tool to see how physical forces affect cells.

New device could make closing surgical incisions a cinch

Biomedical engineers create dissoluble bio material strong enough to protect intestines during...

New device could make closing surgical incisions a cinch

A material strong enough to protect the intestines from a needle puncture and bendable enough to...

Student Spotlight: Aaron Chiou

By researching how cancer works in the body, Aaron Chiou hopes to prevent it from spreading

Did you know?

In 2005, Prof. Larry Bonassar (BME)and Prof. Hod Lipson (MAE) developed the first bio-printing of living tissue and printed a meniscus which lived for three months in incubation. This launched the field of bio-printing.

Latest Spotlights

Student Spotlight: Aaron Chiou

By researching how cancer works in the body, Aaron Chiou hopes to prevent it from spreading

What goes on in there? A visit to Cornell’s Nanoscale Science and Technology Facility

A guided tour of Cornell's CNF, which in 2017 will celebrate 40 years of operations at the very edge of nanoscale science and technology.

OPEN POSITIONS

The Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering is currently seeking applicants for: