Student Organizations

Student organizations in biomedical engineering help connect classroom and career, develop professionalism, increase technical proficiency, and refine ethical judgment.

With over 1,000 recognized student organizations, Cornell has something for everyone. Cornell Engineering maintains a list of student clubs and organizations, and the following is a list of student organizations related to biomedical engineering:

The Undergraduate Chapter of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) at Cornell University

Cornell’s student chapter of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) works to promote the profession of biomedical engineering (BME) through research, educational outreach, and advocacy of engineering approaches to biology and human health.The BMES Undergraduate Chapter aims to support undergraduate biomedical engineering students in their social and academic development at Cornell, as well as to provide support through research and employment resources. It also aims to educate the Cornell and Ithaca community on the field of biomedical engineering, and to provide information about the field and major to students not affiliated with Cornell’s undergraduate biomedical engineering program.

Cornell Society of Women Engineers (SWE)

The Cornell Student Section of the Society of Women Engineers promotes women in Engineering by advocating the importance of diversity and by uniting resources to encourage academic, leadership, professional, and personal excellence for the entire Engineering community of Today and Tomorrow. SWE provides a wide variety of social, outreach, and professional development services for its members and the Cornell Community.

Cornell National Society of Black Engineers

Get involved in the Cornell chapter of this society to help increase the number of culturally responsible Black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community.

Cornell Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE)

The Cornell chapter of SHPE promotes the development of Hispanics in engineering, science and other technical professions to achieve educational excellence, economic opportunity and social equity.